Kortlandt Bibliography Creator

The history of the Netherlands is the history of seafaring people thriving on a lowland river delta on the North Sea in northwestern Europe. Records begin with the four centuries during which the region formed a militarized border zone of the Roman empire. This came under increasing pressure from Germanic peoples moving westwards. As Roman power collapsed and the Middle Ages began, three dominant Germanic peoples coalesced in the area, Frisians in the north and coastal areas, Low Saxons in the northeast, and the Franks in the south.

During the Middle Ages, the descendants of the Carolingian dynasty came to dominate the area and then extended their rule to a large part of Western Europe. The region of the Netherlands therefore became part of Lower Lotharingia within the Frankish Holy Roman Empire. For several centuries, lordships such as Brabant, Holland, Zeeland, Friesland, Guelders and others held a changing patchwork of territories. There was no unified equivalent of the modern Netherlands.

By 1433, the Duke of Burgundy had assumed control over most of the lowlands territories in Lower Lotharingia; he created the Burgundian Netherlands which included modern Belgium, Luxembourg, and a part of France.

The Catholic kings of Spain took strong measures against Protestantism, which polarized the peoples of present-day Belgium and Holland. The subsequent Dutch revolt led to splitting the Burgundian Netherlands into a Catholic French and Dutch-speaking "Spanish Netherlands" (approximately corresponding to modern Belgium and Luxembourg), and a northern "United Provinces", which spoke Dutch and were predominantly Protestant with a Catholic minority. It became the modern Netherlands.

In the Dutch Golden Age, which had its zenith around 1667, there was a flowering of trade, industry, the arts and the sciences. A rich worldwide Dutch empire developed and the Dutch East India Company became one of the earliest and most important of national mercantile companies based on entrepreneurship and trade.

During the 18th century the power and wealth of the Netherlands declined. A series of wars with the more powerful British and French neighbors weakened it. Britain seized the North American colony of New Amsterdam, turning it into New York. There was growing unrest and conflict between the Orangists and the Patriots. The French Revolution spilled over after 1789, and a pro-French Batavian Republic was established in 1795–1806. Napoleon made it a satellite state, the Kingdom of Holland (1806–1810), and later simply a French imperial province.

After the collapse of Napoleon in 1813–15, an expanded "United Kingdom of the Netherlands" was created with the House of Orange as monarchs, also ruling Belgium and Luxembourg. The King imposed unpopular Protestant reforms on Belgium, which revolted in 1830 and became independent in 1839. After an initially conservative period, in the 1848 constitution the country became a parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch. Modern Luxembourg became officially independent from the Netherlands in 1839, but a personal union remained until 1890. Since 1890 it is ruled by another branch of the House of Nassau.

The Netherlands was neutral during the First World War, but during the Second World War, it was invaded and occupied by Nazi Germany. The Nazis, including many collaborators, rounded up and killed almost all the Jews (most famously Anne Frank). When the Dutch resistance increased, the Nazis cut off food supplies to much of the country, causing severe starvation in 1944–45. In 1942, the Dutch East Indies was conquered by Japan, but first the Dutch destroyed the oil wells that Japan needed so badly. Indonesia proclaimed its independence in 1945. Suriname gained independence in 1975. The postwar years saw rapid economic recovery (helped by the American Marshall Plan), followed by the introduction of a welfare state during an era of peace and prosperity. The Netherlands formed a new economic alliance with Belgium and Luxembourg, the Benelux, and all three became founding members of the European Union and NATO. In recent decades, the Dutch economy has been closely linked to that of Germany, and is highly prosperous.

Prehistory (before 800 BC)[edit]

Historical changes to the landscape[edit]

The prehistory of the area that is now the Netherlands was largely shaped by its constantly shifting, low-lying geography.

The Netherlands in 5500 BC
The Netherlands in 3850 BC
The Netherlands in 2750 BC
The Netherlands in 500 BC

  beach ridges and dunes

  tidal sand flats, tidal mudflats, salt marshes

  peat marshes and floodplain silt areas
(including old river courses and riverbank breaches which have filled up with silt or peat)

  Valleys of the major rivers (not covered with peat)

  River dunes (Pleistocene dunes)

  open water (sea, lagoons, rivers)

  Pleistocene landscape (> −6 m compared to NAP)

  Pleistocene landscape ( -6 m – 0 m)

  Pleistocene landscape ( 0 m – 10 m)

  Pleistocene landscape ( 10 m – 20 m)

  Pleistocene landscape ( 20 m – 50 m)

  Pleistocene landscape ( 50 m – 100 m)

  Pleistocene landscape ( 100 m – 200 m)

Earliest groups of hunter-gatherers (before 5000 BC)[edit]

The area that is now the Netherlands was inhabited by early humans at least 37,000 years ago, as attested by flint tools discovered in Woerden in 2010.[1] In 2009 a fragment of a 40,000-year-old Neanderthal skull was found in sand dredged from the North Sea floor off the coast of Zeeland.[2]

During the last ice age, the Netherlands had a tundra climate with scarce vegetation and the inhabitants survived as hunter-gatherers. After the end of the ice age, various Paleolithic groups inhabited the area. It is known that around 8000 BC a Mesolithic tribe resided near Burgumer Mar (Friesland). Another group residing elsewhere is known to have made canoes. The oldest recovered canoe in the world is the Pesse canoe.[3][4] According to C14 dating analysis it was constructed somewhere between 8200 BC and 7600 BC.[4] This canoe is exhibited in the Drents Museum in Assen.

Autochthonoushunter-gatherers from the Swifterbant culture are attested from around 5600 BC onwards.[5] They are strongly linked to rivers and open water and were related to the southern Scandinavian Ertebølle culture (5300–4000 BC). To the west, the same tribes might have built hunting camps to hunt winter game, including seals.

The arrival of farming (around 5000–4000 BC)[edit]

Agriculture arrived in the Netherlands somewhere around 5000 BC with the Linear Pottery culture, who were probably central European farmers. Agriculture was practised only on the loessplateau in the very south (southern Limburg), but even there it was not established permanently. Farms did not develop in the rest of the Netherlands.

There is also some evidence of small settlements in the rest of the country. These people made the switch to animal husbandry sometime between 4800 BC and 4500 BC. Dutch archaeologist Leendert Louwe Kooijmans wrote, "It is becoming increasingly clear that the agricultural transformation of prehistoric communities was a purely indigenous process that took place very gradually."[5] This transformation took place as early as 4300 BC–4000 BC[6] and featured the introduction of grains in small quantities into a traditional broad-spectrum economy.[7]

Funnelbeaker and other cultures (around 4000–3000 BC)[edit]

The Funnelbeaker culture was a farming culture extending from Denmark through northern Germany into the northern Netherlands. In this period of Dutch prehistory the first notable remains were erected: the dolmens, large stone grave monuments. They are found in Drenthe, and were probably built between 4100 BC and 3200 BC.

To the west, the Vlaardingen culture (around 2600 BC), an apparently more primitive culture of hunter-gatherers survived well into the Neolithic period.

Corded Ware and Bell Beaker cultures (around 3000–2000 BC)[edit]

Around 2950 BCE there was a transition from the Funnelbeaker farming culture to the Corded Ware pastoralist culture, a large archeological horizon appearing in western and central Europe, that is associated with the advance of Indo-European languages. This transition was probably caused by developments[clarification needed] in eastern Germany, and it occurred within two generations.[8]

The Bell Beaker culture was also present in the Netherlands.[9][10]

The Corded Ware and Bell Beaker cultures were not indigenous to the Netherlands but were pan-European in nature, extending across much of northern and central Europe.

The first evidence of the use of the wheel dates from this period, about 2400 BC. This culture also experimented with working with copper. Evidence of this, including stone anvils, copper knives, and a copper spearhead, was found on the Veluwe. Copper finds show that there was trade with other areas in Europe, as natural copper is not found in Dutch soil.

Bronze Age (around 2000–800 BC)[edit]

The Bronze Age probably started somewhere around 2000 BC and lasted until around 800 BC. The earliest bronze tools have been found in the grave of a Bronze Age individual called "the smith of Wageningen". More Bronze Age objects from later periods have been found in Epe, Drouwen and elsewhere. Broken bronze objects found in Voorschoten were apparently destined for recycling. This indicates how valuable bronze was considered in the Bronze Age. Typical bronze objects from this period included knives, swords, axes, fibulae and bracelets.

Most of the Bronze Age objects found in the Netherlands have been found in Drenthe. One item shows that trading networks during this period extended a far distance. Large bronze situlae (buckets) found in Drenthe were manufactured somewhere in eastern France or in Switzerland. They were used for mixing wine with water (a Roman/Greek custom). The many finds in Drenthe of rare and valuable objects, such as tin-bead necklaces, suggest that Drenthe was a trading centre in the Netherlands in the Bronze Age.

The Bell Beaker cultures (2700–2100) locally developed into the Bronze Age Barbed-Wire Beaker culture (2100–1800). In the second millennium BC, the region was the boundary between the Atlantic and Nordic horizons and was split into a northern and a southern region, roughly divided by the course of the Rhine.

In the north, the Elp culture (c. 1800 to 800 BC)[11] was a Bronze Age archaeological culture having earthenware pottery of low quality known as "Kümmerkeramik" (or "Grobkeramik") as a marker. The initial phase was characterized by tumuli (1800–1200 BC) that were strongly tied to contemporary tumuli in northern Germany and Scandinavia, and were apparently related to the Tumulus culture (1600–1200 BC) in central Europe. This phase was followed by a subsequent change featuring Urnfield (cremation) burial customs (1200–800 BC). The southern region became dominated by the Hilversum culture (1800–800), which apparently inherited the cultural ties with Britain of the previous Barbed-Wire Beaker culture.

The pre-Roman period (800 BC – 58 BC)[edit]

Iron age[edit]

The Iron Age brought a measure of prosperity to the people living in the area of the present-day Netherlands. Iron ore was available throughout the country, including bog iron extracted from the ore in peat bogs (moeras ijzererts) in the north, the natural iron-bearing balls found in the Veluwe and the red iron ore near the rivers in Brabant. Smiths travelled from small settlement to settlement with bronze and iron, fabricating tools on demand, including axes, knives, pins, arrowheads and swords. Some evidence even suggests the making of Damascus steel swords using an advanced method of forging that combined the flexibility of iron with the strength of steel.

In Oss, a grave dating from around 500 BC was found in a burial mound 52 metres wide (and thus the largest of its kind in western Europe). Dubbed the "king's grave" (Vorstengraf (Oss)), it contained extraordinary objects, including an iron sword with an inlay of gold and coral.

In the centuries just before the arrival of the Romans, northern areas formerly occupied by the Elp culture emerged as the probably Germanic Harpstedt culture[12] while the southern parts were influenced by the Hallstatt culture and assimilated into the Celtic La Tène culture. The contemporary southern and western migration of Germanic groups and the northern expansion of the Hallstatt culture drew these peoples into each other's sphere of influence.[13] This is consistent with Caesar's account of the Rhine forming the boundary between Celtic and Germanic tribes.

Arrival of Germanic groups[edit]

The Germanic tribes originally inhabited southern Scandinavia, Schleswig-Holstein and Hamburg,[14] but subsequent Iron Age cultures of the same region, like Wessenstedt (800–600 BC) and Jastorf, may also have belonged to this grouping.[15] The climate deteriorating in Scandinavia around 850 BC to 760 BC and later and faster around 650 BC might have triggered migrations. Archaeological evidence suggests around 750 BC a relatively uniform Germanic people from the Netherlands to the Vistula and southern Scandinavia.[14] In the west, the newcomers settled the coastal floodplains for the first time, since in adjacent higher grounds the population had increased and the soil had become exhausted.[16]

By the time this migration was complete, around 250 BC, a few general cultural and linguistic groupings had emerged.[17][18]

One grouping - labelled the "North Sea Germanic" – inhabited the northern part of the Netherlands (north of the great rivers) and extending along the North Sea and into Jutland. This group is also sometimes referred to as the "Ingvaeones". Included in this group are the peoples who would later develop into, among others, the early Frisians and the early Saxons.[18]

A second grouping, which scholars subsequently dubbed the "Weser-Rhine Germanic

An oak figurine found in Willemstad, the Netherlands, dating from around 4500 BC. On display in the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden in Leiden. Height: 12.5 cm (4.9 in).
Hunebed D27, the largest dolmen in the Netherlands, located near Borger in Drenthe.
A bronze ceremonial object (not a sword, but called the "Sword of Jutphaas"), dating from 1800–1500 BC and found south of Utrecht
Distribution of the primary Germanic groups c. 1 AD
 

Authors - Complete List

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z
A
Adams, Douglas Q.
  • (1979) Tocharian AB si-n-'Be Oppressed, Afflicted' and A si-n-[B soy-] 'Be satisfied'
Volume 7, p. 315
  • (1985) Designations of the Cervidae in Proto-Indo-European
Volume 13, p. 269
  • (1988) The Indo-European Words for Hair: Reconstructing a Semantic Field
Volume 16, p. 69
Volume 23, p. 399
  • (2005) Tocharian B traksim 'Grains' and an Indo-European Word for 'Berry'
Volume 33, p. 219
  • (2006) Some Implications of the Carbon-14 Dating of Tocharian Manuscripts
Volume 34, p. 381
  • (2006) Etymological Connections of the Tocharian Word for 'Village' and the Germanic Word for 'House'
Volume 34, p. 390
  • (2009) Genitive and Adjective in Tocharian
Volume 37, p. 299
Adrados, Francisco R.
  • (1982) The Archaic Structure of Hittite: The Crux of the Problem
Volume 10, p. 1
  • (1987) Ideas on the Typology of Proto-Indo-European
Volume 15, p. 97
  • (1989) Etruscan as an IE Anatolian (But not Hittite) Language
Volume 17, p. 363
  • (2007) A Panorama of Indo-European Linguistics since the Middle of the Twentieth Century: Advances and Immobilism
Volume 35, p. 12
Agrawal, D. P.
  • (2002) Comments on 'Indigenous Indo-Aryans and the Rigveda'
Volume 30, p. 335
Ahyan, Stépan
  • (1998) Indo-European Mythical Theme of the Final Battle in the 'History of the Armenians' by Movses Khorenatsi
Volume 26, p. 447
  • (2000) A New Mythical Theme in the Saga of Hervör and King Heidrekr and the Armenian "Epic of Sasoon"
Volume 28, p. 373
  • (2004) The Hero, the Woman and the Impregnable Stronghold: A Model
Volume 32, p. 1
  • (2014) The Death of the Suitors and Patricide
Volume 42, p. 211
Akbarzadeh, Daryoosh
  • (2014) China and the Myth of Jam
Volume 42, p. 28
Al-Maini, Douglas
  • (2009) The Political Cosmology of the Homeric Hymn to Demeter
Volume 37, p. 89
Alford, Garth
  • (1991) Eelísion: A Foreign Eschatological Concept in Homer's Odyssey
Volume 19, p. 151
Allen, N. J.
  • (2000) Argos and Hanuman: Odysseus' dog in the light of the Mahábhárata
Volume 28, p. 3
  • (2002) The Stockmen and the Disciples
Volume 30, p. 37
  • (2007) The Heimdall-Dyu Comparison Revisited
Volume 35, p. 233
  • (2009) Early Rome and Indo-European Comparison: Dominique Briquel on Two Crises
Volume 37, p. 489
Allen, Nick
  • (2017) The King-Priest Quarrel in the Ādiparvan and the Iliad
Volume 45, p. 422
Álvarez-Pedrosa, Juan Antonio
  • (2009) Krakow's Foundation Myth: An Indo-European theme through the eyes of medieval erudition
Volume 37, p. 164
Ancillotti, Augusto
  • (1995) Deep Connections between Indo-European Languages
Volume 23, p. 113
Anderson, Earl R.
  • (1999) Horse-Sacrifice and Kingship in the Secret History of the Mongols and Indo-European Cultures
Volume 27, p. 379
Anderson, Earl R. and Vahid Norouzalibeik
  • (2008). Father-Son Combat: An Indo-European Typescene and its Variations
Volume 36, p. 269
Andersen, Paul Kent
  • (1982) On the Word Order Typology of the Shatapathabraahmana
Volume 10, p. 37
Andrijanić, Ivan
  • (2017) A List of Sanskrit and Latin Cognates in Vesdin’s Treatise De Latini Sermonis Origine
Volume 45, p. 195
Anghelina, Catalin
  • (2008). The Immovable Olympus: Olympus as Zeus' Seat
Volume 36, p. 428
  • (2009) Bibliography for The Immovable Olympus
Volume 37, p. 441A
  • (2009) Viṣṇu's Highest Stride
Volume 37, p. 277
Anthony, David W.
  • (1991) The Archaeology of Indo-European Origins
Volume 19, p. 193
  • (2008) A New Approach to Language and Archaeology: The Usatovo Culture and the Separation of Pre-Germanic
Volume 36, p. 1
Aranovsky, Olga R.
  • (1978) On the Interpretation of the 'Knowledge by Suffering' in Aeschylus 'Agamemnon' (176-183)
Volume 6, p. 243
Arans, Olga R. and Christine R. Shea
  • (1994) The Fall of Elpenor: Homeric Kirké and the Folklore of the Caucasus
Volume 22, p. 371
Arbeitman, Brad
  • (1974) Why Two Preverbs (and Only These Two) Became Inseparable in Hittite
Volume 2, p. 70
Arbeitman, Yoël
  • (1976) Anatolian Piya- 'give'
Volume 4, p. 79
  • (1978) An Addendum to 'Why Two Preverbs (and Only These Two) Became Inseparable in Hittite,' JIES 2.1
Volume 6, p. 143
Aritsar, Anthony
  • (1987) The Old Irish Relative and Word Order in Pre-Old Irish
Volume 15, p. 353
Arnal, Jean and Sylvie
  • (1983) The Appearance of an Aristocracy and of Military Architecture in the Fontbuxian Sub-group of Valène-Hortus
Volume 11, p. 1
Austefjord, Anders
  • (1986) On the Oldest Type of Aorists in Indo-European
Volume 14, p. 39
 
(return to top)
B
Bader, Françoise
  • (1986) An IE Myth of Immersion-Emergence
Volume 14, p. 39
  • (1987) Hittite Duratives and the Problem of IE Present-Formations with Infix and Suffix
Volume 15, p. 121
Baldi, Philip
  • (1974) Indo-European *sekw-
Volume 2, p. 77
Bammesberger, Alfred
  • (1982) On the Ablaut of Athematic Verbs in Indo-European
Volume 10, p. 43
  • (1983) The Weak Forms in the Germanic R-Stem Paradigm
Volume 11, p. 105
  • (1983) The Aorist Optative of aa-Roots in Sanskrit
Volume 11, p. 299
  • (1985) The Provenance of the Germanic Stem-Shape *habd
Volume 13, p. 467
  • (1988) The Paradigm of ja- verbs in Germanic
Volume 16, p. 233
  • (1991) On the Etymology of Old English fricca/ friccea
Volume 19, p. 349
  • (1995) Latin quattuor and Its Prehistory
Volume 23, p. 213
  • (1996) On Fresh Fish in Some (Indo-)European Languages
Volume 24, p. 399
Bankoff, J. Arthur and Frederick A. Winter
  • (1984) Northern Intruders in LH IIIC Greece: A View to the North
Volume 12, p. 1
Barber, E. J. W.
  • (1975) The PIE Notion of Cloth and Clothing
Volume 3, p. 294
  • (1989) Archaeolinguistics and the Borrowing of Old European Technology
Volume 17, p. 239
  • (1995) A Weaver's-eye View of the Second Millenium Tarim Basin Finds
Volume 23, p. 347
  • (2003) On Αιγ- as "Protection", Again
Volume 31, p. 337
  • (2010) On Middle Minoan Sites and Sight Lines: Communication Strategies in the Bronze Age Mediterranean
Volume 38, p. 1
Barber, Paul T.
Volume 18, p. 379
  • (1995) Mummification in the Tarim Basin
Volume 23, p. 309
Barðdal, Jóhanna, Valgerður Bjarnadóttir, Serena Danesi, Tonya Kim Dewey, Thórhallur Eythórsson, Chiara Fedrianid & Thomas Smitherman
Volume 41, 321
Barlau, Stephen B.
  • (1976) An Outline of Germanic Kinship
Volume 4, p. 97
Bartoněk, Antonín
  • (2016) In Memoriam, Antonín Bartoněk
Volume 44, p. 520
Barvarova, Mary R.
  • (2004) Topics in Lydian Verse: Accentuation and Syllabification
Volume 32, p. 227
Bauer, Brigitte L. M.
  • (1998) Impersonal Verbs in Italic: Their Development from an Indo-European Perspective
Volume 26, p. 91
  • (2015) Origins of Grammatical Forms and Evidence from Latin
Volume 43, p. 201
Bauschatz, Paul C.
Volume 3, p. 53
Beckwith, Miles C.
  • (2002) Umbrian vestiçia and other Italic Sacraments
Volume 30, p. 205
van Beek, Lucien
  • (2011) The "Saussure effect" in Greek: a reinterpretation of the evidence
Volume 39, p. 129
Beekes, R. S. P.
Volume 4, p. 43
  • (1982) GAv.and the PIE Word for 'Moon, Month,' and the Perfect Participle
Volume 10, p. 53
  • (1987) The Word for 'Four' in Proto-Indo-European
Volume 15, p. 215
  • (1997) Historical Phonology of Iranian
Volume 25, p. 11
  • (1998) The Origin of Latin aqua, and of *teutaa 'people'
Volume 26, p. 459
Beekes, Robert
Volume 37, p. 191
Beeler, M. S.
  • (1973) A New Edition of Venetic Texts
Volume 1, p. 245
Bek-Pedersen, Karen
  • (2006) Oppositions and Cooperations in the Baldr Myth, with Irish and Welsh Parallels
Volume 34, p. 5
  • (2007) A Myth in Folktale Clothing
Volume 35, p. 285
Bellquist, Julie Bonner
  • (1993) 'Badger' in Indo-European
Volume 21, p. 331
Benac, Alojz
  • (1981) Some Problems of the Western Balkans: The Beginning of Indo-Europeanization in the Coastal Zone of Yugoslavia and Albania
Volume 9, p. 15
Bengtson, John D. and Václav Blažek
  • (2005) Sergei Anatolyevich Starostin (March 24, 1953 - September 30, 2005)
Volume 33, p. 307
  • (2012) Comments on Ilija Čašule’s “Correlation of the Burushaski Pronominal System with Indo-European and Phonological and Grammatical Evidence for a Genetic Relationship”
Volume 40, p. 156
Berman, Howard
  • (1973) Word Order in Venetic
Volume 1, p. 252
Best, Jan
  • (1989) Comparative Indo-European Linguistics and Archaeology: Towards a Historical Integration
Volume 17, p. 335
Bezlepkin, Alexander
  • (2014) The Name of Dionysos
Volume 42, p. 18
Bhattacharya, Kamaleswar
  • (1977) On the Relationship Between the Vigrahavyaavartanii and the Nyaayasuutra-s
Volume 5, p. 265
Billigmeier, Jon Chrïstian
  • (1976) The Origin of the Dual Reflex of Initial Cosonantal Indo-European *y in Greek
Volume 4, p. 221
Birnbaum, Henrik
  • (1973) The Original Homeland of the Slavs and the Problem of Early Slavic Linguistic Contacts
Volume 1, p. 407
  • (1974) Pre-Greek Indo-Europeans in the Southern Balkans and Aegean
Volume 2, p. 361
  • (1984) Indo-Europeans between the Baltic and the Black Sea
Volume 12, p. 235
Bizzocchi, Aldo Luiz
  • (2017) Consonantal Alternations in Indo-European Roots: Diatopic and/or Diachronic Variants or Functional Mechanism?
Volume 45, p. 235
Barðdala, Jóhanna, Valgerður Bjarnadóttir, Serena Danesi, Tonya Kim Dewey, Thórhallur Eythórsson, Chiara Fedrianid & Thomas Smitherman
Volume 41, 321
Bjorvand, Harald
  • (2007) The Etymology of English ale
Volume 35, p. 1
Blažek, Václav
  • (2001) On the Baltic Theonyms: Baltic-Italic Correspondences in Divine-Names
Volume 29, p. 351
Volume 30, p. 215
  • (2005) HIC ERANT LEONES: Indo-European "lion"
Volume 33, p. 63
  • (2005) Sergei Anatolyevich Starostin (March 24, 1953 - September 30, 2005)
Volume 33, p. 307
  • (2007) From August Schleicher to Sergei Starostin: On the development of the tree-diagram models of the Indo-European languages
Volume 35, p. 82
  • (2012) Comments on Ilija Čašule’s “Correlation of the Burushaski Pronominal System with Indo-European and Phonological and Grammatical Evidence for a Genetic Relationship”
Volume 40, p. 156
  • (2015) A Long Way to “Far” Tocharian A lo, B lau and A lok, B lauke adv. “(a)far (off); away” in perspective of the Indo-European etymon “long”
Volume 43, p. 57
  • (2015) On the Lengthening of Verbal Bases in Indo-European in an Afroasiatic Perspective
Volume 43, p. 243
  • (2016) Iamos – the Greek Counterpart of the Indo-Iranian Twin-God *Yama-?
Volume 44, p. 350
  • (2017) Indo-European “Gold” in Time and Space
Volume 45, p. 267
Blažek, Václav and Michal Schwarz
  • Prehistory of Tocharian yástaci 'Juniper' in the Perspective of Historical Phonetics
Volume 43, p. 423
Bodeüs, Richard
  • (1974) An Iranian Profile of Democritus?
Volume 2, p. 63
Bomhard, Allen
  • (1977) The 'Indo-European-Semitic' Hypothesis Reexamined
Volume 5, p. 55
  • (1981) A New Look at Indo-European
Volume 9, p. 332
  • (1986) An Etymological Note: PIE *Hs-tér- 'Star'
Volume 14, p. 191
Volume 42, p. 291
Bökönyi, Sandor
  • (1978) The Earliest Waves of Domestic Horses in East Europe
Volume 6, p. 17
Bonfante, Giuliano
  • (1986) The Tocharian Accent (A and B)
Volume 14, p. 301
  • (1987) The Relative Position of the Indo-European Languages
Volume 15, p. 77
  • (1996) The Etymology of híppos
Volume 24, p. 111
  • (1996) Homer Text is Mycenean
Volume 24, p. 115
Bosch-Gimpera, P.
  • (1973) The Migration Route of the Indo-Aryans
Volume 1, p. 513
Boutkan, D. and M. G. Kossmann
  • (1999) Some Berber Parallels of European Substratum Words
Volume 27, p. 87
Braarvig, Jens
  • (1997) Horses and Ships in Vedic and Old Greek Material
Volume 25, p. 345
Bradley, K. R.
  • (1973) The Composition of Suetonius' Caesares Again
Volume 1, p. 257
  • (1976) Imperial Virtues in Suetonius' Caesares
Volume 4, p. 245
Bragg, Lois
  • (2004) Telling Silence: Aligualism in Old Icelandic Myth, Legend, and Saga
Volume 32, p. 267
Bray, Daniel
  • (2000) The End of Mythology: Hesiod's Theogony and the Indo-European Myth of the Final Battle
Volume 28, p. 359
Brekke, Torkel
  • (1998) Note on a Possible Reference to Ikaros in the Vinaya of the Muulasarvaastivaadins
Volume 26, p. 435
Bremmer, Jan
  • (1976) Avunculate and Fosterage
Volume 4, p. 65
Brenneman, Walter
  • (1991) Transformation and Symbolism in the Irish Celtic and IE Cattle Raiding Myth: A Symbolic Analysis
Volume 19, p. 73
Brosman, Paul W., Jr.
  • (1976) The Hittite Gender of Cognates of PIE Feminines
Volume 4, p. 141
  • (1978) The Hittite Gender of Cognates of PIE Neuters
Volume 6, p. 93
  • (1979) The Semantics of the Hittite Gender System
Volume 7, p. 227
  • (1981) The Origin of the PIE A-Stems
Volume 9, p. 255
  • (1982) Designation of Females in Hittite
Volume 10, p. 65
  • (1982) The Development of the PIE Feminine
Volume 10, p. 253
  • (1984) The IE Cognates of the Hittite ai- and au- Stems
Volume 12, p. 345
  • (1986) Lat. fides and the i-Stems with Nom. Sg. es
Volume 14, p. 337
  • (1987) The Latin Fifth-Dimension Nouns with Nom. Sg. iees
Volume 15, p. 327
  • (1992) The Greek Nouns in -ω
Volume 20, p. 317
  • (1994) The Gothic ti-abstracts and the PIE Arbitrary Feminines
Volume 22, p. 347
  • (1997) Confirmation Concerning Two Aspects of Hittite Gender
Volume 25, p. 415
  • (2003) The Cognates of the Latin ti- Abstracts
Volume 31, p. 1
  • (2004) The Latin Feminine u-stems
Volume 32, p. 249
  • (2006) The Cognates of the Vedic í-stems
Volume 34, p. 401
  • (2008) PIH uw > um: A Reaffirmation
Volume 36, p. 383
  • (2010) The Cognates of the Gothic u- Stems
Volume 38, p. 384
Brown, Norman
  • (1974) Prelude to the Indra-Vrtra Battle (Rig-Veda 10,124)
Volume 2, p. 57
Bryant, Edwin
  • (2002) "'Somewhere in Asia,' and No More"
Volume 30, p. 341
Bubenik, Vit
  • (1993) Morphological and Syntactic Change in Late Middle Indo-Aryan
Volume 21, p. 259
Buchholz, Peter
  • (1984) Religious Sculpture in Roman Germania and Adjacent Regions
Volume 12, p. 31
Buchvaldek, Miroslav
  • (1980) Corded Pottery Complex in Central Europe
Volume 8, p. 393
Bulatović, Aleksandar
  • (2014) Corded Ware in the Central and Southern Balkans: A Consequence of Cultural Interaction or an Indication of Ethnic Change?
Volume 42, p. 101
Burton, Philip
  • (1996) Using the Gothic Bible: Notes on Jared S. Klein 'On the Independence of Gothic Syntax'
Volume 24, p. 81
Bush, Archie C. and Joseph H. McHugh
  • (1974) Succession to the Throne of Rome through 192 A.D.
Volume 2, p. 259
Butrimas, Adomas and Gintautas Chesnys
  • (1990) The Emergence of the Pamariu (Baltic Coastal) Group of Indo-Europeans According to Archaeological and Anthropological Data
Volume 18, p. 359
Buyaner, David
  • (2007) The Myth of the Bridge of Separator: a Trace of Shamanistic Practices in Zoroastrianism?
Volume 35, p. 357
 
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C
Caflisch, Jacob Sr.
  • (1977) Typology of a Minimum Étalon-Module: 'Supine'-Like Structures in OCS, Lithuanian, and Finnish
Volume 5, p. 177
  • (1993) Prague Phonology, Vector Typology, and Jacob Grimm
Volume 21, p. 143
Campanile, Enrico
  • (1974) IE Metaphors and Non-IE Metaphors
Volume 2, p. 247
  • (1976) IE and Non-IE Elements in Celtic Dialects
Volume 4, p. 131
  • (1979) Meaning and Prehistory of Old Irish Cú Glas
Volume 7, p. 237
Volume 13, p. 477
Carey, John
  • (2010) Donn, Amairgen, Íth and the Prehistory of Irish Pseudohistory
Volume 38, p. 319
Carney, James
  • (2008) The Pangs of the Ulstermen: An Exchangist Perspective
Volume 36, p. 52
Carruba, Onofrio
  • (2000) Indo-European *sem/sm- in the Pronouns: 'singulative'
Volume 28, p. 341
Čašule, Ilija
  • (2003) Evidence for the Indo-European Laryngeals in Burushaski and Its Genetic Affiliation with Indo-European
Volume 31, p. 21
  • (2012) Correlation of the Burushaski Pronominal System with Indo-European and Phonological and Grammatical Evidence for a Genetic Relationship
Volume 40, p. 59
  • (2012) Response to Discussants
Volume 40, p. 164
Cebrián, Reyes Bertol'n
  • (2010) Some Greek Evidence for Indo-European Youth Contingents of Shape Shifters
Volume 38, p. 343
Cercignani, Fausto
  • (1984) The Enfants Terribles of Gothic 'Breaking': hiri, aiththau etc.
Volume 12, p. 315
Chernykh, E. N.
  • (1980) Metallurgical Provinces of the 5th-2nd Millennia in Eastern Europe in Relation to the Process of Indo-Europeanization
Volume 8, p. 317
Choudhary, P. K.
  • Causes and Effects of Super-stratum Language Influence, with Reference to Maithili
Volume 41, p. 378
Cohen, Gerard Leonard
  • (1979) Etymology of Greek Patass- (=Strike and Related Words)
Volume 7, p. 121
Colarusso, John
  • (1994) Proto-Northwest Caucasian (or How to Crack a Very Hard Nut)
Volume 22, p. 1
  • (1997) Proto-Pontic: Phyletic Links between Proto-Indo-European and Proto-Northwest Caucasian
Volume 25, p. 119
  • (2006) The Functions Revisited, a Nart God of War and Three Nart Heroes
Volume 34, p. 27
  • (2008) The Hunters (Indo-European Proto-myths: The Storm God, The Good King, The Mighty Hunter)
Volume 36, p. 442
Coleman, John E.
  • (2000) An Archaeological Scenario for the "Coming of the Greeks" ca. 3200 B.C.
Volume 28, p. 101
Collinge, N. E.
  • (1973) Pollux, Etymology and Human Error
Volume 1, p. 264
  • (1999) The Laws of Indo-European: The State of the Art (1998)
Volume 27, p. 355
Collins, Alfred
  • (1975) Reflections on Rig-Veda X.129: Stimulated by Walter Maurer's Paper
Volume 3, p. 271
Condax, Iovanna D. and Sansone, David
  • (1974) Methodological Assessment of Willian Diver's 'System of Relevance of the Homeric Verb'
Volume 2, p. 309
Connolly, Leo A.
  • (1983) Germanic r-Preterites
Volume 11, p. 325
Cook, Erwin
  • (1992) Ferrymen of Elysium and the Homeric Phaecians
Volume 20, p. 239
Costello, John R.
  • (1973) The Placement of Crimean Gothic by Means of Abridged Test Lists in Glottochronology
Volume 1, p. 479
  • (1982) The Absolute Construction in Indo-European: A Syntagmemic Reconstruction
Volume 10, p. 235
Cowgill, Warren
  • (1973) The Source of Latin staare, with Notes on Comparable Forms Elsewhere in Indo-European
Volume 1, p. 271
 
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D
D'Iakonov, I. M.
  • (1985) On the Original Home of the Speakers of Indo-European
Volume 13, p. 92
Dahl, Eystein
  • The Indo-European Subjunctive and its Origin as a Present
Volume 41, p. 392
Dahm, Murray K.
  • (2011) Roman Frontier Signalling and the Order of the fupark
Volume 39, p. 1
Daly, D. M.
  • (1973) Additional Evidence That PIE was 'Verb-Final'
Volume 1, p. 518
Danka, Ignacy Ryszard and Witczak, Krzysztof Tomasz
  • (1997) Indo-European *kwnHos and Its Meanings in the Neolithic and Post-Neolithic Times
Volume 25, p. 361
Barðdala, Jóhanna, Valgerður Bjarnadóttir, Serena Danesi, Tonya Kim Dewey, Thórhallur Eythórsson, Chiara Fedrianid & Thomas Smitherman
Volume 41, 321
Danov, Hristo M.
  • (1983) Some Characteristic Moments in Thraco-Greek Relations during the Pre-Roman Period
Volume 11, p. 231
Daryaee, Touraj
  • (2002) Sight, Semen, and the Brain: Ancient Persian Notions of Physiology in Old and Middle Iranian Texts
Volume 30, p. 103
Davis-Kimball, Jeannine
  • (1997) Sauro-Sarmatian Nomadic Women: New Gender Identities
Volume 25, p. 327
De Decker, Filip
  • (2012) Are Latin pons, pontifex and the Indo-European cognates evidence of an i stem?
Volume 40, p. 11
  • (2015) Another Attempt at a Chronology for Grassmann’s Law in Greek
Volume 43, p. 140
  • (2017) Ὅμηρον ἐξ Ὁμήρου σαφηνίζειν: An Analysis of Augment Use in Iliad 1
Volume 45, p. 58
De La Puente, Inés García
  • (2006) The Liberation of Kiev sub anno 968
Volume 34, p. 201
de Simone, Carlo
  • (1976). Messapic Damatira/Damatura - Balkanic ('Illyrian')
Volume 4, p. 355
de Vaan, Michiel
  • (2009). The derivational history of Greek ἵππος and ἱππεύς
Volume 44, p. 198
  • (2016). The Early C. C. Uhlenbeck on Indo-European
Volume 44, p. 173
Della Volpe, Angela
  • (1988) Hillfort Nomenclature in Indo-European: The Case of Latin urbs
Volume 16, p. 195
  • (1990) From the Hearth to the Creation of Boundaries
Volume 18, p. 157
  • (1992) On Indo-European Ceremonial and Socio-Political Elements Underlying the Origin of Formal Boundaries
Volume 20, p. 71
Dergachev, V.
  • (2000) The Migration Theory of Marija Gimbutas
Volume 28, p. 257
Deshpande, Madhav M.
  • (1993) Aryans, Non-Aryans, and Braahmanas: Processes of Indigenization
Volume 21, p. 215
Barðdala, Jóhanna, Valgerður Bjarnadóttir, Serena Danesi, Tonya Kim Dewey, Thórhallur Eythórsson, Chiara Fedrianid & Thomas Smitherman
Volume 41, 321
Diebold, Richard
  • (2014). In Memoriam, Richard Diebold
Volume 42, p. 209
Dieterle, Richard L.
  • (1985) The Hidden Warrior: The Social Code of the Volundarkviða
Volume 13, p. 283
  • (1987) The Thirty Brothers
Volume 15, p. 169
Dinu, Marin
  • (1981) Clay Models of Wheels Discovered in Copper Age Cultures of Old Europe Mid-Fifth Millennium B. C.
Volume 9, p. 1
Doi, Toshio
  • (1986) Verbal Nouns in Longes Mac nUisnig
Volume 14, p. 247
Drews, Robert
  • (1997) PIE Speakers and PA Speakers
Volume 25, p. 327
  • (2005) The Laurion Mines and a Bronze Age Name for the Greek Mainland
Volume 33, p. 227
Driessen, C. Michiel
  • (2001) On the Etymology of Lat. urbs
Volume 29, p. 41
  • (2003) Evidence for *ghelh2-, a New Indo-European Root
Volume 31, p. 279
  • (2003) *h2é-h2us-o-, the Proto-Indo-European Term for 'gold'
Volume 31, p. 347
  • (2004) Towards an Indo-European Term for 'Felt'
Volume 32, p. 25
Drinka, Bridget
  • (1988) Evidence for the Space-Time Hypothesis: The IE s-Aorist
Volume 16, p. 253
Dubuisson, Daniel
  • (1978) The Apologues of Saint Columba and Solon or the 'Third Function' Denigrated
Volume 6, p. 231
Duchesne-Guillemin
  • (1973) On the Complaint of the Ox-Soul
Volume 1, p. 101
Ducœur, Guillaume
  • (2008). Passing through Flood Waters in Vedic Thought
Volume 36, p. 67
Duhoux, Yves
  • (1998) Pre-Hellenic Language(s) of Crete
Volume 26, p. 1
Dumézil, Georges
Volume 1, p. 304
Dunkel, George
  • (1979) Fighting Words: Aleman Partheneion mákhonai
Volume 7, p. 249
 
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E
Ellis, Linda
  • (1978) Reinterpretation of the West Slavic Cult Site in Arkona
Volume 6, p. 1
  • (1980) Analysis of Cucuteni-Tripolye and Kurgan Pottery and the Implications for Ceramic Technology
Volume 8, p. 211
Egeler, Matthias
  • (2009) Textual Perspectives on Prehistoric Contacts: Some Considerations on Female Death Demons, Heroic Ideologies and the Notion of Elite Travel in European Prehistory
Volume 37, p. 321
Epstein, Angelique Gulermovich
  • (1994) Miscarriages and Miraculous Births in Indo-European Tradition
Volume 22, p. 151
Erdal, Marcel
  • (1993) Around the Turkic 'Apple'
Volume 21, p. 27
Erol, Ayse F.
  • (2008) Analysing the Relationship between the Crescent Shaped Shield and the Amazons
Volume 36, p. 411
Eska, Charlene M.
  • (2012) Celtic and Germanic Light on Hittite Divorce Law
Volume 40, p. 300
Eska, Joseph F.
  • (2014) Comments on John T. Koch’s Tartessian-as-Celtic Enterprise
Volume 42, p. 428
Eska, Joseph F. (and Rex E. Wallace)
  • (2002) Thoughts on Vercelli eu
Volume 30, p. 129
Estell, Michael
  • (1999) Orpheus and Rbhu Revisited
Volume 27, p. 327
(Quintela, Marco V. García and) Manuel Santos Estévez
  • (2004) Proto-Indo-European, Pre-Indo-European, Old European Archaeological Evidence and Linguistic Investigation
Volume 32, p. 319
Everson, Michael
  • (1989) Tenacity in Religion, Myth, and Folklore: The Neolithic Goddess of Old Europe Preserved in a Non-Indo-European Setting
Volume 17, p. 277
Barðdala, Jóhanna, Valgerður Bjarnadóttir, Serena Danesi, Tonya Kim Dewey, Thórhallur Eythórsson, Chiara Fedrianid & Thomas Smitherman
Volume 41, 321
 
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F
Facchetti, Giulio M.
  • (2005) The Interpretation of Etruscan Texts and its Limits
Volume 33, p. 359
Fairbanks, Gordon H.
  • (1977) Case Inflections in Indo-European
Volume 5, p. 101
Fanaie, Mozhgan, Farrokh Hajiani, and Mohsen Mahmoudi
  • (2016) An Etymological Study of Some Words in the Baboli Dialect
Volume 44, p. 391
Barðdala, Jóhanna, Valgerður Bjarnadóttir, Serena Danesi, Tonya Kim Dewey, Thórhallur Eythórsson, Chiara Fedrianid & Thomas Smitherman
Volume 41, 321
Fenwick, Rhona S. H.
  • (2016) Descendants and Ancestry of a Proto-Indo-European Phytonym *meh2l-
Volume 44, p. 441
Ferguson, Ian
  • (1989) Malta: Builder of Temples, Builders of Dolmens
Volume 17, p. 215
Fernández Palacios, Fernando
  • QVNO, A Celtic Personal Name in a Roman Inscription from Forua (Busturialdea, Bizkaia, Spain), Celtic Personal Names in Bizkaia and “Dogs” in the Iberian Peninsula
Volume 45, p. 313
Ferrer, Eduardo Blasco
  • (2010) Iberian ordumeles, Paleo-Sardinian Ortumele, Ortarani and Araunele. Cognitive Semantics and Substrata Research
Volume 38, p. 373
Fickett-Wilbar, David
  • (2012) Ritual Details of the Irish Horse Sacrifice in Betha Mholaise Daiminse
Volume 40, p. 315
Fisher, Jay
  • (2008) Asterisking Ennius: The Annales of Quintus Ennius and the Indo-European Tradition
Volume 36, p. 333
Fleming, Harold C.
  • (2000) Glottalization in Eastern Armenian
Volume 28, p. 155
Flowers, Stephen E.
  • (1983) Toward an Archaic Germanic Psychology
Volume 11, p. 117
Floyd, Edwin D.
  • (1975) Dissimilation of Nasals in Greek Pefasmai, etc.
Volume 3, p. 283
  • (1992) Bacchylides 18.31 and Indo-European Poetics
Volume 20, p. 305
Fol, Alexander
  • (1983) Interpraetatio Thracica
Volume 11, p. 217
Forni, Gianfranco
  • (2013) Evidence for Basque as an Indo-European Language
Volume 41, p. 39
  • (2013) Evidence for Basque as an Indo-European Language: A Reply to the Critics
Volume 41, p. 268
Fournet, Arnaud
  • (2010) About the Mitanni-Aryan Gods
Volume 38, p. 26
Francalacci, Paolo
  • (1995) DNA Analysis of Ancient Desiccated Corpses from Xinjiang
Volume 23, p. 385
Franklin, John Curtis
  • (2002) Harmony in Greek and Indo-Iranian Cosmology
Volume 30, p. 1
Frantikova, Dita
  • (2015) Hittite Participles – Adjectives or Verbs?
Volume 43, p. 178
Freeman, Philip M.
  • (1989) New Evidence for Pre-Greek Labiovelars
Volume 17, p. 171
  • (1998) Saturnian Verse and Early Latin Poetics
Volume 26, p. 61
Friedrich, Paul
  • (1973) Defilement and Honor in the Iliad
Volume 1, p. 119
  • (1973) Introduction to the First Meeting of the Indo-European Section of the Linguistic Society of America
Volume 1, p. 403
  • (1974) A Brief Comment of Condax-Sansone (ConSan)
Volume 2, p. 325
Volume 4, p. 207
Fries, Almut
  • (2016) Indo-European Night Raid Revisited
Volume 44, p. 289
 
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G
Gadre, Pramod B.
  • (1974) The Symbols: Triratna and Nandipada
Volume 2, p. 157
Gallay, Alain
  • (1981) The Western Alps from 2500 to 1500 B.C. (3400-2500 B.C.) Traditions and Cultural Changes
Volume 9, p. 33
Gamkrelidze, T. V. and V. V. Ivanov
  • (1985) The Ancient Near East and the Indo-European Question: Temporal and Territorial Characteristics of Proto-Indo-European Based on Linguistic and Historico-Cultural Data
Volume 13, p. 3
  • (1985) The Migrations of Tribes Speaking Indo-European Dialects from their Original Homeland in the Near East to their Historical Habitations in Eurasia
Volume 13, p. 49
  • (1985) The Problem of the Original Homeland of the Speakers of Indo-European Languages in Response to I. M. Diakonoff's Article
Volume 13, p. 175
Gamkrelidze, Thomas V.
  • (1987) The Indo-European Glottalic Theory: A New Paradigm in IE Comparative Linguistics
Volume 15, p. 47
  • (1989) Proto-Indo-Europeans in Anatolia
Volume 17, p. 341
Garbutt, Kathleen
  • (2006) An Indo-European Night Raid?
Volume 34, p. 183
Gening, V. F.
  • (1979) The Cemetery at Sintashta and the Early Indo-Iranian Peoples
Volume 7, p. 1
Gercenberg, Leonard G.
  • In Memoriam — Leonard G. Gercenberg
Volume 41, p. 493
Gerow, Edwin
  • (1973) 'Frost' in Rig-Veda
Volume 1, p. 224
Gheorghiu, Dragos
  • (1994) Horse Head Sceptres - First Images of Yoked Horses
Volume 22, p. 221
Giacomelli, Gabriella
  • (1973) A Problem in Praenestine Palaeography
Volume 1, p. 309
Giannakis, Georgios K.
  • (2009) (Historical) Linguistics and (Classical) Philology
Volume 37, p. 351
Gimbutas, Marija
  • (1973) Old Europe c. 7000-3500 B.C.: The Earliest European Civilization before the Infiltration of the Indo-European Peoples
Volume 1, p. 1
  • (1973) The Beginning of the Bronze Age in Europe and the Indo-Europeans: 3500-2500 B.C.
Volume 1, p. 163
  • (1973) 'Kurgan' Battle-axes: An Archaeological Note
Volume 1, p. 464
  • (1973) Perkunas/Perun - The Thunder God of the Balts and Slavs
Volume 1, p. 466
  • (1974) An Archaeologist's View of PIE in 1975
Volume 2, p. 289
  • (1977) The First Wave of Eurasian Steppe Pastoralists
Volume 5, p. 277
  • (1980) The Kurgan Wave #2 (c. 3400-3200 B.C.) into Europe and the Following Transformation of Culture
Volume 8, p. 273
  • (1985) Primary and Secondary Homeland of the Indo-Europeans: Comments on the Gamkrelidze-Ivanov Articles
Volume 13, p. 185
  • (1989) Introductory Remarks: The Transformation of European and Anatolian Culture 4500-2500 B.C.
Volume 17, p. 193
  • (1989) Social Structure of Old Europe
Volume 17, p. 197
  • (1990) Social Structure of Old Europe: Part 2-4
Volume 18, p. 225
Goedicke, Hans
  • (1973) Hippopotamus - An Egyptian Word
Volume 1, p. 316
Golab, Zbigniew
  • (1975) Veneti/Venedi - The Oldest Name of the Slavs
Volume 3, p. 321
  • (1985) Slavic komon' and kon' “equus”: An Attempt at Etymology against the Background of the History of Domestication
Volume 13, p. 415
  • (1995) Slavic chelovek' "homo" against the Background of Proto-Slavic Terminology
Volume 23, p. 179
Good, Irene
  • (1995) Notes on a Bronze Age Textile Fragment from Hami, Xinjiang with Comments on the Significance of Twill
Volume 23, p. 319
Gorrochategui, Joaquín and Joseba A. Lakarra
  • (2013) Why Basque Cannot be, Unfortunately, an Indo-European Language
Volume 41, p. 203
Gorton, Luke
  • (2017) Revisiting Indo-European ‘Wine’
Volume 45, p. 1
Greene, Jesse Laurence
  • (1978) Indo-European Social Tripartism in Book I of the Cædmonian Paraphrase
Volume 6, p. 263
  • (1982) Object-Verb and Verb-Object Sequences in Beowulf
Volume 10, p. 71
Greppin, John A.
  • (1973) Xvarenah as a Transfunctional Figure
Volume 1, p. 232
  • (1975) Hittite -z (a), Armenian -z-, and the Theory of Armeno-Hittite loan Words
Volume 3, p. 87
  • (1976) Skt. Garuda, Gk. géranos: The Battle of the Cranes
Volume 4, p. 233
  • (1977) A Note on Dacian *barðo- (>Rom. barza 'Stork': Arm. brdor 'Lammer geyer')
Volume 5, p. 203
Volume 6, p. 141
Volume 10, p. 347
  • (1987) Armenian art 'field' and Arm. acem 'drive'
Volume 15, p. 393
  • (1988) The Various Aloës in Ancient Times
Volume 16, p. 33
  • (1989) Armenian and the Theory of Etymology
Volume 17, p. 165
  • (1997) A Note on Georgian USX- and Indo-Europeanisms in the Kartvelian Languages
Volume 25, p. 383
  • (1999) Gk. κοστος: A Fragrant Plant and its Eastern Origin
Volume 27, p. 395
  • (2008) More Material on the Urartian Substratum in Armenian
Volume 36, p. 79
  • (2010) Armenian t- 'not' and the Proto-Lezgian Dental Negative
Volume 38, p. 203
  • (2016) In Memoriam, John A. C. Greppin
Volume 44, p. 170
Griffith, R. Drew
Volume 27, p. 79
Griffith, Toby D.
  • (2003) The Inscriptions on Jela 1 and 2
Volume 31, p. 87
  • (2004) Deciphering the Inscriptions on Jela 1 and 2
Volume 32, p. 11
Grottanelli, Cristiano
  • (1986) Yoked Horses, Twins, and the Powerful Lady: India, Greece, Ireland and Elsewhere
Volume 14, p. 125
Gurshtein, Alexander A.
  • (2005) Did the Pre-Indo-Europeans Influence the Formation of the Western Zodiac?
Volume 33, p. 103
 
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H
Haarmann, Harald
  • (1989). Writing from Old Europe to Ancient Crete - A Case of Cultural Continuity
Volume 17, p. 251
  • (1994). Contact Linguistics, Archaeology and Ethnogenetics: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Indo-European Homeland Problem
Volume 22, p. 265
  • (1998). On the Problem of Primary and Secondary Diffusion of Indo-Europeans and Their Languages
Volume 26, p. 391
(Rahimian, Jalal and) Farrokh Hajiani
  • (2009) Semantic-pragmatic functions of in Persian: a diachronic and synchronic study
Volume 37, p. 399
Halla-Aho, Jussi
  • (2005). Two Borrowings in Proto-Slavic, and a Minor Balto-Slavic Sound Change
Volume 33, p. 233
Hammer, Niels
  • (2015) Eurasian Cranes, Demoiselle Cranes, PIE *ger- and Onomatopoetics
Volume 43, p. 81
Hamp, Eric P.
  • (1973). Another Lesson from 'Frost'
Volume 1, p. 215
  • (1973). Religion and Law from Iguvium
Volume 1, p. 318
Volume 1, p. 507
  • (1974). Reply by Eric P. Hamp
Volume 2, p. 95
  • (1974). 'Ivy' in Italic and Celtic
Volume 2, p. 187
  • (1981). Notes on the Old English Bee Charm
Volume 9, p. 338
Volume 10, p. 187
  • (1982). Gothic inu, Greek áneu, OHG ânu 'Ohne'
Volume 10, p. 189
Volume 10, p. 190
  • (1983). IE *meHenot- and the Perfect Participle
Volume 11, p. 379
  • (1984). Indo-European and Balto-Slavic 'Sheep'
Volume 12, p. 192
  • (1987). Indo-Hittite *men- 'see'
Volume 15, p. 391
  • (1987). IE *eui-kV [fem.]
Volume 15, p. 392
  • (1988). *sor- 'woman' and 'Indo-Hittite'
Volume 16, p. 121
  • (1988). On Indo-European Marriage in Old English
Volume 16, p. 183
  • (1994). Belated Comment on Pulleyblank's 'The Typology of Indo-European,' JIES 21:1-2
Volume 22, p. 435
Volume 30, p. 145
  • (2012). Comments on Čašule’s “Correlation of the Burushaski Pronomial System with Indo-European”
Volume 40, p. 154
Hansen, Jellison Leigh
  • (1980). Death and the Indo-Europeans: Some Traditions
Volume 8, p. 31
Hansen, Ove
  • (1987). On the Recently Published Inscribed Gold Ring from the Argolid
Volume 15, p. 390
Harbison, Peter
  • (1975). The Coming of the Indo-Europeans to Ireland: An Archaeological Viewpoint
Volume 3, p. 101
Harkness, John
  • (2011) The Novilara Stele Revisited
Volume 39, p. 13
Häusler, Alexander
  • (1977). Comment on 'The Chronology of the Early Kurgan Tradition'
Volume 5, p. 369
Herity, Michael
  • (1981). Irish Decorated Neolithic Pottery and Its Context
Volume 9, p. 69
  • (1991). The Phases of the Irish Neolithic
Volume 19, p. 29
Hewson, John
  • (1984). Resonant and High Vowel in Proto-Indo-European
Volume 12, p. 375
Hicks, Harry H. and Robert N. Anderson
  • (1990). Analysis of an Indo-European Vedic Aryan Head - 4500-2500 B.C.
Volume 18, p. 425
Hicks, Ronald
  • (2009). Cosmography in Tochmarc Étaíne
Volume 37, p. 115
Hicks, Ronald and Laura Ward Elder
  • (2003). Festivals, Deaths, and the Sacred Landscape of Ancient Ireland
Volume 31, p. 307
Hilmarsson, Jorundur
  • (1982). Indo-European 'Tongue'
Volume 10, p. 355
Hirunuma, Toshio
  • (1986). The Dialects of Ancient Northern Italy
Volume 14, p. 205
Hoenigswald, Henry M.
  • (1973). Indo-European *p in Celtic and the Claims for a Relative Chronology
Volume 1, p. 324
  • (1977). Diminutives and Tatpurusas: The Indo-European Trend toward Endocentricity
Volume 5, p. 9
Holland, Gary B.
  • (1996). Relativization and Word Order in Old Irish and Vedic Sanskrit
Volume 24, p. 323
Hollifield, Patrick
  • (1978). Indo-European Etymologies
Volume 6, p. 173
Holm, Hans J.
  • (2011) "Swadesh lists" of Albanian Revisited and Consequences for Its Position in the Indo-European Languages
Volume 39, p. 45
Holton, Frederick S.
  • (1993). Literary Tradition and the Old English Bee Charm
Volume 21, p. 37
Hopkinson, Beatrice
  • (1975). Archaeological Evidence of Saltmoulding at Important European Saltsites and Its Relationship to the Distribution of Urnfielders
Volume 3, p. 1
Hopper, Paul J.
  • (1977). The Typology of the Proto-Indo-European Segmental Inventory
Volume 5, p. 41
Horowitz, Michael G.
  • (1996). The Scientific Dialectic of Ancient Greece and the Cultural Tradition of Indo-European Speakers
Volume 24, p. 409
  • (2003). Iceland's Pjódveldi (930-1264) and the Traditional Innovation of IE Speakers
Volume 31, p. 41
Houben, Jeffrey L.
  • (1977). Word-Order Change and Subordination in Homeric Greek
Volume 5, p. 1
Hraste, Daniel Necas and Kresimir Vukovic
  • (2011) Rudra-Shiva and Silvanus-Faunus: Savage and Propitious
Volume 39, p. 100
Hristova, Daniela S.
  • (2004). Absolute Contructions in Slavic: Case Diversity and Originality
Volume 32, p. 297
Huld, Martin
  • (1990) The Linguistic Typology of the Old European Substrate in North Central Europe
Volume 18, p. 389
  • (1995) Grassman’s Law in Messapic
Volume 23, p. 147
  • (1997) The Loins of Antimachus
Volume 25, p. 409
  • (2002) Some Thoughts on Amazons
Volume 30, p. 93
  • (2002) Linguistic Science, Truth, and the Indocentric Hypothesis
Volume 30, p. 353
  • (2005) Albanian akull and Indo-European ‘water’
Volume 33, p. 53
  • (2007) Albanian gogël and Indo-European ‘acorns’
Volume 35, p. 121
  • (2009) Proto-Indo-Europeans and the Squirrel, Sciurus vulgaris
Volume 37, p. 130
  • (2011) Was there an Indo-European word for ‘pear’?
Volume 39, p. 380
  • (2012) Comments on Čašule’s “Correlation of the Burushaski Pronomial System with Indo-European”
Volume 40, p. 162
  • (2012) An Old (but Reconstructible) Chestnut
Volume 40, p. 344
  • (2014) Armenian agṙaw and an Indo-European Word for ‘Crow, Raven’
Volume 42, p. 294
Humphreys, S. C.
  • Proto-Indo-European Kinship and Society: Kin Terms
Volume 45, p. 373
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I
Igartua, Iván
  • (2014) The Indo-European Adjectival Class with the Suffix *-lo- and its Development in Slavic
Volume 42, p. 302
Isaac, G. R.
  • (1993) Numbers in Early Welsh Poetry
Volume 21, p. 359
Izui, Hisanosuke
  • (1986) Indo-European Perfect and the Hittite Verbal System
Volume 14, p. 195
 
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J
Jackson, Peter
  • (1996) The Codes of Inheritance: Some Remarks on an Indo-European Palimpsest
Volume 24, p. 305
Jasanoff, Jay H.
  • (1983) A Rule of Final Syllables
Volume 11, p. 139
  • (1983) Reply to Schmalstieg and Korlandt
Volume 11, p. 187
Volume 14, p. 183
Jeffers, Robert J.
  • (1973). Problems in the Reconstruction of Proto-Italic
Volume 1, p. 330
Jendza, Craig
  • Theseus the Ionian in Bacchylides 17 and Indo-Iranian Apām Napāt
Volume 41, p. 431
Jezhich, Mislav
  • (1988) The Transfer of Divine Attributes in the Rksamhita
Volume 16, p. 127
Jia, Peter Wei Ming and Alison V. G. Betts
  • (2010). A Re-analysis of the Qiemu'erqieke (Shamirshak) Cemeteries, Xinjiang, China
Volume 38, p. 275
Jones, Alex I.
  • (1992) Language and Archaeology: Evaluating Competing Explanations of the Origins of the Indo-European Languages
Volume 20, p. 31
Jones-Bley, Karlene
  • (1990) So That Fame Might Live Forever - The Indo-European Burial Tradition
Volume 18, p. 215
  • (1991) The Earliest IE Burial Tradition in Pre-Celtic Ireland
Volume 19, p. 1
Jordan-Cólera, Carlos
  • (1997) The Etymology of Insula, Aestus and Aestuarium
Volume 25, p. 353
Jovanich, Borislav
  • (1976) The Scordisci and the Dacians during the First Century B.C.
Volume 4, p. 81
  • (1983) Some Elements of the Steppe Culture in Yugoslavia
Volume 11, p. 31
  • (1993) Silver in the Yamma (Pit-Grave) Culture in the Balkans
Volume 21, p. 207
Juric, Dorian
  • (2010) A Call for Functional Differentiation of the South Slavic Vila
Volume 38, p. 172
Justus, Carol F.
  • (1978) Syntactic Changes: Evidence for Restructuring among Coexistent Varients
Volume 6, p. 107
  • (1983) Indo-Europeanization of Myth and Syntax in Anatolian Hittite: Dating of Texts as an Index
Volume 11, p. 59
  • (1996) Numeracy and the Upper German Decades
Volume 24, p. 45
Volume 27, p. 525
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K
Kaczyńska, Elwira
  • (2016) Two Indo-European Verbal Roots *leĝ- and *sleĝ- in the Light of Old and New Lexical Data
Volume 44, p. 147
Kaiser, M. and V. Shevoroshkin
  • (1985) On Indo-European Laryngeals and Vowels
Volume 13, p. 377
  • (1986) Inheritance v. Borrowing in IE, Kartvelian, and Semitic
Volume 14, p. 365
Kalicz, Nandor
  • (1980) The Balaton-Lasinja Culture Groups in Western Hungary, Austria, and Northwestern Yugoslavia Concerning Their Distribution and Origin
Volume 8, p. 245
Kalicz-Schreiber, Rozsa
  • (1990) Symbolic Representations on Early Bronze Age Vessels
Volume 18, p. 59
Kallio, Petri
  • (2015) Nugae Indo-Uralicae
Volume 43, p. 368
Karalinuunas, Simas
  • (1993) Reflexes of IE *h2rtk'o- 'bear' in Baltic
Volume 21, p. 367
Kassian, Alexei
  • (2013) On Forni’s Basque–Indo-European Hypothesis
Volume 41, p. 181
Kassian, Alexei, Mikhail Zhivlov, and George Starostin
  • (2015) Proto-Indo-European-Uralic Comparison from the Probabilistic Point of View
Volume 43, p. 301
  • (2015) Lexicostatistics, Probability, and Other Matters
Volume 43, p. 376
Katona, A. L.
  • (2000) Proto-Greeks and the Kurgan Theory
Volume 28, p. 65
Katz, Joshua T.
  • (2006) The "'Urbi et Orbi'-Rule" Revisited
Volume 34, p. 319
Kazama, Kiyozo
  • (1986) A Phase of the History of India
Volume 14, p. 289
Kazanas, N. D.

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