Effects Of Dehumanization In Night Essay

Dehumanization In Night Essay

Many themes exist in Night, Elie Wiesel’s nightmarish story of his Holocaust experience. From normal life in a small town to physical abuse in concentration camps, Night chronicles the journey of Wiesel’s teenage years. Neither Wiesel nor any of the Jews in Sighet could have imagined the horrors that would befall them as their lived changed under the Nazi regime. The Jews all lived peaceful, civilized lives before German occupation. Eliezer Wiesel was concerned with mysticism and his father was “more involved with the welfare of others than with that of his own kin” (4). This would change in the coming weeks, as Jews are segregated, sent to camps, and both physically and emotionally abused. These changes and abuse would dehumanize men and cause them to revert to basic instincts. Wiesel and his peers devolve from civilized human beings to savage animals during the course of Night.
Segregation from the rest of society begins the dehumanization of Sighet Jews. The first measure taken by the Hungarian Police against Jews is to label them with yellow stars. Early in Night, while life is still normal despite German occupation of their town, Wiesel explains: “Three days later, a new decree: every Jew had to wear the yellow star” (11). This decree is demoralizing to Jews because it labels them and sets them apart from the rest of Sighet’s population. Like trees marked for logging or dogs marked with owner tags, many people in Sighet are marked with yellow stars, to reveal their Jewish faith. Avni describes Wiesel and the Jews as being “propelled out of himself, out of humanity, out of the world as he knew it” (Avni 140). The Jews are taken out of the normal lives they have led for years and are beginning to follow new rules set by the Germans. The fact that Jews must identify themselves in this way begins the dehumanization by lowering their self-esteem and pride.
After being identified by stars, Jews are physically separated and herded into two ghettos. Wiesel explains the new order shortly after the star decree is announced: “Two ghettos were created in Sighet. A large one in the center of town occupied four streets, and another smaller one extended over several alleyways on the outskirts of town” (11). Far beyond labeling them, this decree orders Jews to pack up and move. The Germans order them to corral in a certain part of town, much like a farmer might order his animals around, and the Germans treat the Jews as second-class citizens. The Jews are seen as inferior by Germans and are secluded into ghettos, which, by their definition, can be seen as small concentration camps, a precursor to the true concentration camps Jews will be sent to later.
After being moved within their town, relocation to another country is the final step taken in separating Jews from society. Wiesel’s father shares the news of relocation after a meeting with local leaders: “‘The news is terrible...Transports.’ The ghetto was to be liquidated entirely....

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

Madness in Elie Wiesel’s Night, and William Golding’s Lord of the Flies

2374 words - 9 pages Mankind has struggled throughout eternity, battling the demons that come from the very depths of the soul. Elie Wiesel’s novel, Night, and William Golding’s novel, Lord of the Flies show how quickly humans can descend into chaos and savagery. When dehumanization presents itself in unruly civilizations, humans turn into more primitive beings. The process of dehumanization begins through a loss of morals, knowledge, and innocence. ...

The Theme of Dehumanization in Breakfast of Champions

1907 words - 8 pages The Theme of Dehumanization in Breakfast of Champions "Dear Sir, poor sir, brave sir: You are an experiment by the Creator of the Universe." (Vonnegut 259) Imagine if this was addressed to you. What an awful feeling of betrayal and loneliness you would no doubt get. But what if next you heard this? "You are the only creature in the entire Universe who has free will. You are the only one who has to figure out what to do next-and why....

The Effect of Dehumanization and Subhumanization in Nazi Germany

1903 words - 8 pages Dr. Spencer, with a PhD in Social Science in International Conflicts said, “Dehumanization is the psychological process whereby opponents view each other as less than human and thus not deserving of moral consideration.” (“Dehumanization of the Enemy”). Dehumanization, or subhumanization, was a major contributor to the success of concentration camps. If people were not killed immediately upon arrival (after the collection of all possessions),...

The Dehumanization Process in the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave

2294 words - 9 pages The Dehumanization Process in the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave Throughout American history, minority groups were victims of American governmental policies, and these policies made them vulnerable to barbaric and inhumane treatment at the hands of white Americans. American slavery is a telling example of a government sanctioned institution that victimized and oppressed a race of people by indoctrinating and...

The History of The Holocaust

787 words - 3 pages According to Kaplan, some methods used to exclude or eliminate Jews from the German society includes motions such as dehumanization, anti-Semitic laws, the ordering of the Jews to wear the star of David, Kristallnacht ( the night of the broken glass), and last but not least Genocide. With all the motions and cruel acts that took place in order to eliminate and separate a deserving race from another, this movement takes place as one of the...

The Human Layers

1474 words - 6 pages The human being is made up of various layers and coatings that are earned, through experience and time. Each individual is challenged with a set of hardships that once conquered grant the key to success, and add a layer. Each layer consists of morals, beliefs, and teaching that will eventually stack one on top of the other to create a unique individual, with his or her own identity, and mind. The process of dehumanization can be seen like the...

The Holocaust and Dehumanization in Primo Levi's Survival in Auschwitz

3239 words - 13 pages The Holocaust and Dehumanization as seen in Primo Levi's

Comparing Beloved and Night

2491 words - 10 pages Comparing Beloved and Night     The two novels I am writing about are "Night" by Elie Wiesel and "Beloved," by Toni Morrison.  Beloved tells about slavery and an ex-slave mother's struggle with a past which is projected as the haunting of her people.  It tells the story of Sethe, a mother compelled to kill her child, rather than let the child live a life of slavery.  Toni Morrison uses ghosts and the supernatural to create an enhanced...

Desensitization in Night

1126 words - 5 pages All humans are supposed to have emotion, but when people don’t have anything to hold on to positive emotions can become dormant. The memoir Night, by Elie Wiesel, is Wiesel’s story from surviving the Holocaust with the help of his father and fighting to stay alive day by day. Wiesel suffered from brutal conditions in labor camps and managed to survive through the agony while watching others perished every day. The unnatural behavior by the S.S....

Nazi Dehumanizing Ways

672 words - 3 pages Nazi Dehumanizing Ways Everyone is different and that is what makes the world a wonderful place, at least one would think. But 1944 and 1945 German folks called Nazis discriminated against anyone that was different from them. Nazi soldiers made people feel less o f a person, all because they believed in different faiths. In the story The Night written by Elie Wiesel, a holocaust survivor he tells of the dehumanizing ways of the Nazi soldiers...

A commentary essay based on "Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl" which the work is analyzed in comparison to Elie Wiesel's "Night".

940 words - 4 pages In the novel "Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl", the author uses several literary devices to contribute to both the major and minor themes of the memoir. Such literary devices are...

Dehumanization In Night Essay

Night, by Elie Wiesel, is a chilling story about Wiesel’s first-hand accounts of the Jewish treatment in concentration camps during the holocaust. Elie, a young boy from Sighet, Romania, had comfortable Jewish life learning about his religion. After Elie’s teacher, Moshe the Beatle, is taken, things in Elie’s world begin going wrong. Soon, things begin to change rapidly as Elie enters a cruel and unusual world he’s never seen. Hitler, a German chancellor, was a leader who used his powers to exterminate the Jews, who he saw as “parasites who infiltrated the societies in which they lived” (Karesh). Hitler “stripped the Jews of their rights” using “drastic measures” that ended up ruining the lives of millions (Karesh). In Elie Wiesel’s memoir Night, we learn about the hardships of the Jews as they are dehumanized by Hitler and his Nazi followers.
During the holocaust, the Jewish suffered a great loss of their possessions and freedoms as they entered the concentration camps. One of the first losses was the loss of the Jew’s basic freedoms entitled to them as citizens. As the Nazi’s began to take control, the freedoms lessen. Elie recalls the situation, saying “We no longer had the right to frequent restaurants or cafes, to travel by rail, to attend synagogue, to be on the streets after 8 o’clock in the evening” (Wiesel 11). These rules were the first of many, and they began to restrict how the Jews chose to live. When the Jews are sent to the concentration camps and sorted, one of the first things the Nazi’s take from them is their possessions such as watches and jewelry. The Jews had almost nothing already- they had been forced to leave almost everything behind. Soon, the Jews lose their clothing, shoes, and even their hair. Elie states the horrors as he states, “I let myself be dragged along to the barbers. Their clippers tore out our hair, shaved every hair on our bodies” (Wiesel 35). The loss of the Jew’s final possessions and freedoms were one of the first things the Jews would have to endure as they entered the concentration camp, and the worlds of horror.
When the Jews entered the...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

Madness in Elie Wiesel’s Night, and William Golding’s Lord of the Flies

2374 words - 9 pages Mankind has struggled throughout eternity, battling the demons that come from the very depths of the soul. Elie Wiesel’s novel, Night, and William Golding’s novel, Lord of the Flies show how quickly humans can descend into chaos and savagery. When dehumanization presents itself in unruly civilizations, humans turn into more primitive beings. The process of dehumanization begins through a loss of morals, knowledge, and innocence. ...

The Theme of Dehumanization in Breakfast of Champions

1907 words - 8 pages The Theme of Dehumanization in Breakfast of Champions "Dear Sir, poor sir, brave sir: You are an experiment by the Creator of the Universe." (Vonnegut 259) Imagine if this was addressed to you. What an awful feeling of betrayal and loneliness you would no doubt get. But what if next you heard this? "You are the only creature in the entire Universe who has free will. You are the only one who has to figure out what to do next-and why....

The Effect of Dehumanization and Subhumanization in Nazi Germany

1903 words - 8 pages Dr. Spencer, with a PhD in Social Science in International Conflicts said, “Dehumanization is the psychological process whereby opponents view each other as less than human and thus not deserving of moral consideration.” (“Dehumanization of the Enemy”). Dehumanization, or subhumanization, was a major contributor to the success of concentration camps. If people were not killed immediately upon arrival (after the collection of all possessions),...

The Dehumanization Process in the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave

2294 words - 9 pages The Dehumanization Process in the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave Throughout American history, minority groups were victims of American governmental policies, and these policies made them vulnerable to barbaric and inhumane treatment at the hands of white Americans. American slavery is a telling example of a government sanctioned institution that victimized and oppressed a race of people by indoctrinating and...

The History of The Holocaust

787 words - 3 pages According to Kaplan, some methods used to exclude or eliminate Jews from the German society includes motions such as dehumanization, anti-Semitic laws, the ordering of the Jews to wear the star of David, Kristallnacht ( the night of the broken glass), and last but not least Genocide. With all the motions and cruel acts that took place in order to eliminate and separate a deserving race from another, this movement takes place as one of the...

The Human Layers

1474 words - 6 pages The human being is made up of various layers and coatings that are earned, through experience and time. Each individual is challenged with a set of hardships that once conquered grant the key to success, and add a layer. Each layer consists of morals, beliefs, and teaching that will eventually stack one on top of the other to create a unique individual, with his or her own identity, and mind. The process of dehumanization can be seen like the...

The Holocaust and Dehumanization in Primo Levi's Survival in Auschwitz

3239 words - 13 pages The Holocaust and Dehumanization as seen in Primo Levi's

Comparing Beloved and Night

2491 words - 10 pages Comparing Beloved and Night     The two novels I am writing about are "Night" by Elie Wiesel and "Beloved," by Toni Morrison.  Beloved tells about slavery and an ex-slave mother's struggle with a past which is projected as the haunting of her people.  It tells the story of Sethe, a mother compelled to kill her child, rather than let the child live a life of slavery.  Toni Morrison uses ghosts and the supernatural to create an enhanced...

Desensitization in Night

1126 words - 5 pages All humans are supposed to have emotion, but when people don’t have anything to hold on to positive emotions can become dormant. The memoir Night, by Elie Wiesel, is Wiesel’s story from surviving the Holocaust with the help of his father and fighting to stay alive day by day. Wiesel suffered from brutal conditions in labor camps and managed to survive through the agony while watching others perished every day. The unnatural behavior by the S.S....

Nazi Dehumanizing Ways

672 words - 3 pages Nazi Dehumanizing Ways Everyone is different and that is what makes the world a wonderful place, at least one would think. But 1944 and 1945 German folks called Nazis discriminated against anyone that was different from them. Nazi soldiers made people feel less o f a person, all because they believed in different faiths. In the story The Night written by Elie Wiesel, a holocaust survivor he tells of the dehumanizing ways of the Nazi soldiers...

A commentary essay based on "Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl" which the work is analyzed in comparison to Elie Wiesel's "Night".

940 words - 4 pages In the novel "Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl", the author uses several literary devices to contribute to both the major and minor themes of the memoir. Such literary devices are...

0 Replies to “Effects Of Dehumanization In Night Essay”

Lascia un Commento

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *