To Kill A Mockingbird Essay Summary Ideas

+ All To Kill A Mockingbird Essays:

  • Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Justice System in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Study of Families in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Children Who Kill
  • Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Social Classes in Maycomb, to Kill a Mockingbird
  • Prejudice in To Kill A Mocking Bird
  • Racism in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • To Kill a Mockingbird Essay Questions/Answers
  • To Kill A Mockingbird: Analysis of Atticus
  • Stereotypes and Discrimination in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • No-Kill Shelters Rehabilitation for Animals
  • Racial Prejudice in the Bluest Eye and to Kill a Mockingbird
  • Use of Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Atticus Finch in To Kill A Mocking Bird is an Accommodator Not an Activist
  • Us of Symbols in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • To Kill a Mocking Bird Reflection
  • The Story of an Hour/the Joy That Kills
  • Is Atticus a Good Father in To Kill a Mockingbird?
  • Racial Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Atticus the Hero in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • The Significance of the Title of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Critical Lens "Fear Is Simply the Consequence of Every Lie"
  • Themes of Courage, Prejudice, and Maturity in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Why is the Novel Called To Kill a Mockingbird?
  • Oswald Didn't Kill Kennedy
  • Influence of Stereotypes in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Smoking Will Kill You Softly
  • Scout's Childhood Simplicity in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird
  • A Rose for Emily: Why Ms. Emily Did Not Kill Homer Barron
  • Parental Roles in to Kill a Mockingbird: Calpurnia
  • To Kill A Mockingbird: Understanding Prejudice in Our Lives
  • Interracial Relationships in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The Narrator Debate: To Kill A Mockingbird
  • The Trial in To Kill a Mocking Bird
  • Boo is a Crazy Maniac in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • To Kill a Mockingbird: Character Analysis of Jem and Scout
  • The Mockingbird Theme in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
  • Scottsboro Trial: The Real Trial of Tom Robinson in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Mockingbird
  • Examine How Lee Presents the Character of Atticus in to Kill a Mockingbird
  • To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Examples of Prejudice in To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee
  • Animal Shelters and the No Kill Movement
  • "To Kill a Mockingbird" Metaphor Analysis: It is a Sin to Kill Tom Robinson
  • Southern Prejudice in Harper Lee´s To Kill a Mockingbird
  • The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck and To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
  • Racism Kills Thoughts in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Stereotyped Characters in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Misconceptions about Human Behavior in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Guns Kill vs. People Kill
  • Use of Minor Characters in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Sexism, Prejudice, and Racism in Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Stronger
  • To Kill a Mocking Bird Chapter Summaries
  • The Significance of the Title To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Racist Society in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird
  • How Harper Lee explores the theme of prejudice in the novel To kill
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Mythology and Archetypes in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Social Values in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The Solution to Stereotypes in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Comparing the Movies A Time to Kill, by John Grisham and To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Analysing Harper Lee and his Characters in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Social Forces in to Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Literature Adds To Reality
  • The Positive Impact of Atticus, Calpurnia and Aunt Alexandra on Scout in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • To Kill a Mockingbird: The Book vs. The Movie
  • Innocents in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird: Scout's Childhood Innocence and Growing Maturity
  • Film Scene Analysis: The Crazy 88s from 'Kill Bill Vol 1'
  • Atticus as a Hero, in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Maycomb Society in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Learning from Experience in To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Jem´s Maturity in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Feature Article Racism- to Kill a Mockingbird Etc

Scout Finch lives with her brother, Jem, and their widowed father, Atticus, in the sleepy Alabama town of Maycomb. Maycomb is suffering through the Great Depression, but Atticus is a prominent lawyer and the Finch family is reasonably well off in comparison to the rest of society. One summer, Jem and Scout befriend a boy named Dill, who has come to live in their neighborhood for the summer, and the trio acts out stories together. Eventually, Dill becomes fascinated with the spooky house on their street called the Radley Place. The house is owned by Mr. Nathan Radley, whose brother, Arthur (nicknamed Boo), has lived there for years without venturing outside.

Scout goes to school for the first time that fall and detests it. She and Jem find gifts apparently left for them in a knothole of a tree on the Radley property. Dill returns the following summer, and he, Scout, and Jem begin to act out the story of Boo Radley. Atticus puts a stop to their antics, urging the children to try to see life from another person’s perspective before making judgments. But, on Dill’s last night in Maycomb for the summer, the three sneak onto the Radley property, where Nathan Radley shoots at them. Jem loses his pants in the ensuing escape. When he returns for them, he finds them mended and hung over the fence. The next winter, Jem and Scout find more presents in the tree, presumably left by the mysterious Boo. Nathan Radley eventually plugs the knothole with cement. Shortly thereafter, a fire breaks out in another neighbor’s house, and during the fire someone slips a blanket on Scout’s shoulders as she watches the blaze. Convinced that Boo did it, Jem tells Atticus about the mended pants and the presents.

To the consternation of Maycomb’s racist white community, Atticus agrees to defend a black man named Tom Robinson, who has been accused of raping a white woman. Because of Atticus’s decision, Jem and Scout are subjected to abuse from other children, even when they celebrate Christmas at the family compound on Finch’s Landing. Calpurnia, the Finches’ black cook, takes them to the local black church, where the warm and close-knit community largely embraces the children.

Atticus’s sister, Alexandra, comes to live with the Finches the next summer. Dill, who is supposed to live with his “new father” in another town, runs away and comes to Maycomb. Tom Robinson’s trial begins, and when the accused man is placed in the local jail, a mob gathers to lynch him. Atticus faces the mob down the night before the trial. Jem and Scout, who have sneaked out of the house, soon join him. Scout recognizes one of the men, and her polite questioning about his son shames him into dispersing the mob.

At the trial itself, the children sit in the “colored balcony” with the town’s black citizens. Atticus provides clear evidence that the accusers, Mayella Ewell and her father, Bob, are lying: in fact, Mayella propositioned Tom Robinson, was caught by her father, and then accused Tom of rape to cover her shame and guilt. Atticus provides impressive evidence that the marks on Mayella’s face are from wounds that her father inflicted; upon discovering her with Tom, he called her a whore and beat her. Yet, despite the significant evidence pointing to Tom’s innocence, the all-white jury convicts him. The innocent Tom later tries to escape from prison and is shot to death. In the aftermath of the trial, Jem’s faith in justice is badly shaken, and he lapses into despondency and doubt.

Despite the verdict, Bob Ewell feels that Atticus and the judge have made a fool out of him, and he vows revenge. He menaces Tom Robinson’s widow, tries to break into the judge’s house, and finally attacks Jem and Scout as they walk home from a Halloween party. Boo Radley intervenes, however, saving the children and stabbing Ewell fatally during the struggle. Boo carries the wounded Jem back to Atticus’s house, where the sheriff, in order to protect Boo, insists that Ewell tripped over a tree root and fell on his own knife. After sitting with Scout for a while, Boo disappears once more into the Radley house.

Later, Scout feels as though she can finally imagine what life is like for Boo. He has become a human being to her at last. With this realization, Scout embraces her father’s advice to practice sympathy and understanding and demonstrates that her experiences with hatred and prejudice will not sully her faith in human goodness.

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