Seneca Gpa Assignment Of Benefits

Overview

This diploma provides a base in business skills then specializes in insurance-related courses.  You will complete 8 credits toward the CIP designation from the Insurance Institute of Canada.

Information Session

New students are invited to attend an information session.

Curriculum

In order to meet Seneca's breadth requirements for diploma or advanced diploma programs, students must successfully complete at least 3 general education courses toward their program, satisfying the following criteria:

Effective January 2017, EAC394 will be replaced by EAC894

College English (EAC150) is not a general education course.

Student may not use ECN501 or ECN502 as a general education course in the Business Insurance Diploma.


Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

College English is an introductory college writing and reading course fundamental to successful college studies. Through a variety of assignments and classroom activities, students strive to develop the rhetorical and analytical skills essential to their success as communicators in college and upon graduation. Fiction and nonfiction are central vehicles for teaching writing.



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Introduction to Business Administration

Prerequisite(s):

EAC150 or equivalent

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the Canadian business environment, business issues and functions, and the major forces at work in the global economy. It provides students with a perspective of business firms as integrated organizations composed of a number of specialized functions.

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer



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Prerequisite(s):

EAC150 or equivalent. May be taken concurrently.

Marketing is an approach to business that puts the customer at the centre of its activities and focuses on satisfying customer needs and wants. While marketing is used by both profit and not-for-profit organizations to meet the demands of the market place, this course introduces students to the fundamental marketing concepts used by profit oriented business organizations.

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer



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Prerequisite(s):

No required prerequisite, but a strong foundation in mathematics at the Grade XII level is recommended

For business personnel, this course covers fundamentals of mathematics for business and finance: ratios, proportions, percentages, break-even analysis, commissions, trade and cash discounts, simple interest and discount, compound interest and discount, equation of values, and ordinary annuities.

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer



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Prerequisite(s):

No required prerequisite, but students should have Grade 12 English and Mathematics or equivalent

This course introduces the student to how accounting information is used by, and meets the needs of both internal and external users through effective and efficient communication as well as what accounting information is required by a business concern to reflect clearly the operating results of the enterprise over its operating life. Throughout the course, students will be introduced to generally accepted accounting principles, the interpretation and preparation of financial statements and how this information is recorded in the various business records.

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer



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Microcomputer Applications for Business

Prerequisite(s):

A fundamental working knowledge of Windows Operating Systems and Excel Software.

Building on the skills they have previously acquired in Excel and Windows operating systems, students will further develop their proficiency in these areas and add Access to their skill set. Throughout the course, they will apply these software skills to solve business problems.

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer



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Principles and Practices of Insurance

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

This course introduces the concept of risk and shows how insurance deals with risk. Students examine the basic concepts and language of insurance, the legal context of insurance and, the participants in the industry and their relationship to each other. The principles covered in this course underlie every situation encountered in insurance and every policy and courses studied subsequently.



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Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

This course is an introduction to property insurance. It lays the foundation for all types of property insurance, and then discusses the perils, clauses, and limitations in the most common personal lines policies. Students will see how policies develop, with unique perils, clauses, and limitations to suit changing needs.



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Insurance Against Liability Part I

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

This course introduces students to those legal principles that affect liability insurance including an introduction to the Canadian legal system and the differences between the common law and the Civil Code of Quebec. The course includes discussion of some of the more common ways people become liable to each other and explains how this liability may be insured or why it cannot be insured.



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Automobile Insurance Part I

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

This is a detailed study of automobile insurance in Canada. It deals with legislation related to automobile insurance and policies and regulations, concentrating primarily on personal coverages. The course gives students an overall view of the different provincial approaches to automobile insurance and some of the problems related to it. Students will deal in detail with Owner Policies.



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Introduction to Principles of Economics - Macro

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

This course introduces the process and principles of macroeconomic thought as they have been developed to explain the determination of the levels of national income and output, employment, the price level and other macroeconomic aggregates. The implications of these principles of public policy in Canada will be examined in the contexts of money and banking, stabilization efforts, international trade, the structure of the Canadian economy, and responses to the emerging patterns of global competition.



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Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

The course begins with an overview of the underwriter's role as an investor of shareholder capital on behalf of the insurer. The role of the underwriter has evolved and students will learn how the underwriter accepts or reflects risk for the insurer within parameters both set by the insurer and imposed by the external environment.



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Prerequisite(s):

EAC150 or equivalent

The ability to write clearly and directly is highly prized in organizations. In order to succeed in today's information overload world, writers must be able to effectively articulate ideas quickly, clearly and concisely in proposals, emails, reports, memos, project plans and through social media. This course focuses on creating professional-quality documents for realistic business situations, with an emphasis on audience analysis, appropriateness and editing. Other topics include formal and informal outlining techniques, how to revise for wordiness, unnecessary phrases, redundancy and jargon, and e-correspondence in an "organizational" setting.

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer



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Building and Maintaining Customer Relationships

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

This course is intended to develop your understanding of customer service and the skills associated with understanding the needs of customers, meeting those needs and fostering an environment that encourage customers to return. It will be of interest to anyone who works with customers, either internal or external, on a daily basis.



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Fraud Prevention and Awareness

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

Students will learn how fraud may arise under insurance policies and what initiatives the insurance industry had advanced to fight fraud. The cost of fraud is discussed as well as the laws that affect how insurers must handle claims investigations and settlements. Property, liability and automobile claims are covered.



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Essentials of Loss Adjusting

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

Focused knowledge of insurance and professional conduct within the claims domain forms the core of this course. Soft skills and knowledge required to handle claims are blended into the curriculum in order to improve fundamental claims handling techniques. Students will learn about managing relationships in order to gather critical information in the claims handling process. A step-by-step process delivers the key to policy analysis for coverage evaluations. Students will also learn the fundamentals of investigation, evaluation, negotiation and settlement within the claims process.



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Essential Skills for the Insurance Broker & Agent

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

This course provides an overview of insurance business practices from the broker's perspective and begins by introducing the broker as an insurance intermediary. Students learn the needs of personal lines clients and small commercial risks and the skills that typical grocer will use to perform effectively. Students will follow the progress of a risk from initial contact with the client through the evaluation and application process, to binding and policy documents. Major product lines and common policy transactions handled by brokers will be reviewed.



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Business Law for Accounting

Outline
Typically Offered
Fall,
Winter,
Summer

This course will provide an introduction to Canadian Business Law with an emphasis on legal issues relevant to accounting. Topics will include: the Canadian legal system, tort law and professional liability, contract law, specific commercial contracts (including sale, insurance and employment), negotiable instruments and security interests and partnerships and corporations. Students will develop an ability to recognize and respond appropriately to legal situations that occur in an accounting environment.



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OSAP Funding Available

This program is eligible for OSAP funding.

Course load is used by OSAP to determine funding options for programs.

If you are taking 1 - 2 courses at the same time, you may be considered for part-time student grants and loans.

  • 1 course (20%)
  • 2 courses (40%)

If you are taking 3 or more courses at the same time, you may be considered for full-time student grants and loans.

  • 3 courses (60%)
  • 4 courses (80%)
  • 5 courses (100%)

To find out if you qualify and to learn how to apply, please visit the OSAP website.

For information on other awards and financial assistance, please see Financial Aid.

Credit for Prior Learning

Prior Learning Assessment

Earn college credits for what you already know!
Prior Learning Assessment is a method of assessing and recognizing learning that is equal to college level learning, but has been gained outside a traditional classroom (through work experience, volunteering, outside study, etc.). If you can prove that the knowledge you have gained meets the outcomes of a Seneca course, then credit will be awarded.

How does the PLA process work?
Prior Learning is demonstrated through a "challenge" process. The process measures learning through a variety of methods which may include tests, portfolio assessment, interviews, demonstrations, essays, and work samples. The method used will be determined in consultation with a Program Coordinator.
For more information and to determine if you are eligible for PLA, please call the Program Coordinator.

The process may take from 6 to 8 weeks.

Note: Not all courses can be challenged. For more information go to PLA website or contact your Program Coordinator.

Transfer Credit (Advanced Standing)

Many students who enter Seneca College will have earned academic credits in post-secondary educational institutions which they may be able to apply toward completion of a Seneca College program.

Requests for Transfer Credit must be for a specific course and must be accompanied by an official transcript and course outline. A minimum grade of "C" (60 percent) is generally required for a course to be considered for Transfer Credit.

Download a Transfer Credit Request form. An official copy of your transcript and applicable detailed course outlines should be attached and submitted. Please note it may take 4 to 6 weeks for a Transfer Credit decision.

More Information

Please visit the Degree and Credit Transfer Office.

Graduation/Convocation

When you meet all program requirements and become eligible for a certificate, diploma, or degree, you must inform the Registrar by completing a Graduation Application form and paying the graduation and alumni fee. Certificates, diplomas, and applied degrees are issued twice a year in the Fall (October) and Spring (June).

For further information including deadlines and fees, please visit the  Convocation website or contact the Convocation Office at 416-491-5050 ext. 77461.

Minimum Performance for Graduation

Students will only be eligible to graduate with a Seneca College certificate or diploma if they have maintained an overall good standing in their current program of study. Students in degree programs will be eligible to graduate when they have obtained an average of C (2.5 GPA) in courses in the main field of study, and an average of C (2.0 GPA) in all other courses.

Diploma to Degree

Congratulations on finishing your diploma. Now you can turn it into a degree. We offer the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Degree through part-time studies here at Seneca. Please go to the Interdisciplinary Studies Degree link for more information about this program and how to apply your diploma through credit transfer.

Here are some degree options that may also be of interest to you.

Information Session

New students are invited to attend an information session.

Seneca College Transcript - Grading Information

Request a Seneca College Transcript

Final Grades

Effective September 1, 2013 all courses offered by the College are graded or designated as follows:

1. Final Grades

      Grade Point Value
    A+90% to 100%4.0
    A80% to 89%4.0
    B+75% to 79%3.5
    B70% to 74%3.0
    C+65% to 69%2.5
    C60% to 64%2.0
    D+55% to 591.5
    D50% to 54%    (See 8.9)1.0
    F0% to 49%      (Not a Pass)0.0
    OR DNARegistered but did not attend and did not officially withdraw0.0
    EXCExcellent-
    SATSatisfactory-
    UNSATUnsatisfactory-

2. Temporary Grades

    SUPSupplemental privilege granted for whatever reason (see 8.5)
    DEFDeferred examination granted (see 8.6)
    INCSpecific work needs to be completed before final grade will be assigned (see 8.7)
    IPIn Progress

 

3. Other Designation

    DNARegistered but did not attend and did not officially withdraw
    WDWithdrew from course officially before deadline (without penalty)
    DNCDid not complete
    ***Officially withdrew from College
    ADVAdvanced Standing
    EXMExemption
    ATTAttendance Satisfactory
    AEGAegrotat (see 8.4)

Grading Policy

Effective September 1, 2000 to August 31, 2013 all courses offered by the College are graded or designated as follows:

GradeNumerical Scale of MarksGrade Point Value
A+90% to 100%4
A80% to 89%4
B+75% to 79%3.5
B70% to 74%3
C+65% to 69%2.5
C60% to 64%2
D55% to 59%1
F0% to 54% (Not a Pass)0
DNADid not attend0

***Where appropriate the grade assigned may be converted to numeric form for calculation of the grade point average. Other grades are not included in GPA calculation.

Alternate Grade Scale

AEGAegrotat
ADVAdvanced Standing
ATTAttendance Satisfactory
DEFDeferred examination granted
DNARegistered but did not attend and did not officially withdraw
DNCDid not complete
EXCExcellent
EXMExemption
INCSpecific work needs to be completed before final grade will be assigned
SATSatisfactory
SUPSupplemental Privilege granted for whatever reason
UNSATUnsatisfactory
WDWithdrew from course officially before deadline (without penalty)
***Officially withdrew from College
PRProfessional Course
RTRelated Theory (Professional)
POProfessional Option
ENEnglish & Communications
CANCanadian Studies
CULCultural Studies
NATNatural Sciences
SOCSocial Sciences
NCNon-Credit
OPOpen Option

Grading Policy

Effective September 1, 1989 to August 31, 2000 all courses offered by the College were graded or designated as follows:

1. Final Grade

A(D)Distinguished 
AExcellent80% to 100%
BAbove Average70% to 79%
CSatisfactory60% to 69%
DPass55% to 59%
FUnsatisfactory0% to 54%
OR
EXCExcellent 
SATSatisfactory 
UNSATUnsatisfactory 

2. Temporary Grades

SUPSupplemental privilege granted for whatever reason
DEFDeferred examination granted
INCSpecific work needs to be completed before final grade will be assigned

3. Other Designation

DNARegistered but did not attend and did not officially withdraw
WDWithdrew from course officially before deadline (without penalty)
DNCDid not complete
***Officially withdrew from College
ADVAdvanced Standing
EXMExemption
ATTAttendance Satisfactory

Prior to September 1, 1989 all courses offered by the College are graded or designated as follows:

1. Final Grades

A(D)Consistently Outstanding Achievement (with Distinction)
AOutstanding Achievement
BAchievement of all the prescribed competencies
CAchievement of a defined proportion of the prescribed competencies
DMarginal Achievement (See Note (#) below)
FUnacceptable Achievement - No Supplemental Privilege
D(S)D Grade with Supplemental Privilege
F(S)F Grade with Supplemental Privilege
DNWDid Not Write
DNW(S)Did Not Write, with Supplemental Privilege
DNADid Not Attend

(#) May be ruled an insufficient level of achievement in specified competencies required for graduation, in which case the Chair of the Promotion Committee shall supply details of the requirements for upgrading to the necessary standard by way of a comment on the Student Academic Record.

2. Alternate Grade Scale

* DNCDid Not Complete a Semester Course
* INCIncomplete
* ADVAdvanced Standing
* EXMExemption
* AEGAegrotat Standing
* ***Officially Withdrew from the College
* SATSatisfactory
* UNSATUnsatisfactory
*ATTSpecial Interest - Attendance Satisfactory

* Does not affect the Grade Point Average.

Categories

PRProfessional Course
RTRelated Theory (Professional)
POProfessional Option
ENEnglish & Communications
CANCanadian Studies
CULCultural Studies
NATNatural Sciences
SOCSocial Sciences
EACLiterature Studies
SESLiterature Studies
NCNon-Credit
OPOpen Option

Aegrotat Standing

If the student does not officially withdraw, but could not write the examination or complete a portion of the term work due to illness or any other equally compelling reason, he/she may be accorded Aegrotat Standing (AEG). Where AEG is awarded, it represents the minimum pass for graduation purposes. A student who is awarded Aegrotat Standing may request permission to write a deferred examination. If such a student achieves a grade higher than the minimum, this will be the grade credited for the course.

Incomplete Grade

With the approval of the Promotion Committee a student may be given the grade "INC" (Incomplete). In this case the student will receive a letter indicating work yet to be completed and the date by which it must be submitted to satisfy the course requirements. The notation "INC" will be changed to "F" if the assigned work is not completed by the designated date.

Non-Applicable Credits

On the recommendation of the Promotion Committee, grades such as DNA, F, ***, ATT or "D" (non-credit) may be transferred from the upper portion of the transcript to the Non-Applicable Credits section.

Similarly, courses not germane to the program in which the student is currently registered, may be transferred to the Non-Applicable Credits section upon recommendation of the Promotion Committee.

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